John Green's tumblr: Radiohead wouldn't exist without early major-label funding. The future won't bring new Radioheads. All I want to say...

immutableinscrutable:

In the wake of recent future-of-music discussions—Louis CK’s direct-ticketing move, which may indeed revolutionize touring for artists with that large of an audience, and the Emily White/All Songs Considered/David Lowery thing—I’ve been having arguments about record labels and money. I was kind of shocked that few people knew the ground-level math, the nuts-and-bolts inconvenient truth: the diminishment of labels means there’s little money to fund the initial touring costs of new bands.

Remember a few months ago when I posted my Trailhead about stealing music? Well, if you missed it, go back and re-read it. It’s still an issue important to me and I become enraged just thinking about the argument in support of stealing music.

Then, come back here and click the link above to read two quick pieces. The first is by Mike Doughty of the bad Soul Coughing and is an explanation of what losing record labels means for musicians. The second is a continuation of the theme penned by John Green (hero to a few of us at The Compass), author of several books. His paragraphs focus on the publishing world.

In the United States right now, there is a lot of venom spat at corporations. I do some of the spitting myself. But it’s important to recognize the possibilities such assemblies allow. Tearing down corporations, destroying their structures, will not necessarily give us the better world we envision. Nor will tolerating their greed or powerful reach give us access to all of the creative people out there. It’s a combination of the two that we require. And in this time of great discord and partisan gridlock, we should remember how important compromise and moderation is.

-Paul

soundsfamiliarpodcast:

Download | iTunes | RSS ] 

It’s happened again. Your favorite TV show (or graphic novels or movie franchise or podcast) is headed down the tubes. The shark has been jumped, and now there’s no looking back.

What does it mean for a series to be in decline? What does it look like? And why does it happen? I intend to find out, with the help of Arthur Fonzarelli, Steve Urkel and Fast Eddie, creator and administrator at tvtropes.org.

If you enjoy this podcast and have a few minutes to help out, take the listener survey! It will help determine the future of the show: http://www.instant.ly/s/Lqb1sGmA4AA

This is the season finale of Sounds Familiar, a podcast by friend of the Compass and Instruments Band member, Blake Cooper. We’ve linked to Blake a couple times, maybe even this podcast, but I’m reblogging it again. 

One, this episode is very interesting and such a great subject to look at considering a vast majority of people consume this kind of media. Two, Blake’s work on this podcast has been solid on every episode. 

With my daily commute to work, I’ve been listening to A LOT of radio after getting bored with my cycle of CDs. Lots of NPR and sports radio, two very different animals. If the radio show isn’t just somebody riffing for hours (sports radio), or interviews (Talk of the Nation), this mini podcast format is generally the bulk of the show. Which is great for me because sometimes I don’t have time to sit in my car and listen to the rest of a story and there is a shorter period of time to concentrate. And honestly, if I heard one of Blake’s stories pop up on the radio, I wouldn’t be surprised. Well at first, I would be like “HOLY SHIT I KNOW THAT GUY,” but I wouldn’t feel like it was out of place at all. The production and presentation of his podcast is stellar and he finds great sources to add to his already interesting subjects.

So check it out, as you’ll notice, this is the season finale, but you can check out the rest of the episodes at http://soundsfamiliarpodcast.tumblr.com/ If you want to help Blake out, he’s looking for feedback on the show and has a link up to a short survey to improve the podcast, you can take that here.

Quality stuff and I can’t wait for him to start up again.

—Tim

Saturday Reblog: You’re Not Special

It’s graduation season, a time in which our country’s more seasoned citizens share their wisdom with those who will come next. David McCullough Jr., a teacher out of a school in my adopted state of Massachusetts, shares his opinions in this well-written graduation speech.

-Paul

Dan Harmon Poops: HEY, DID I MISS ANYTHING?

danharmon:

Kids:

A few hours ago, I landed in Los Angeles, turned on my phone, and confirmed what you already know. Sony Pictures Television is replacing me as showrunner on Community, with two seasoned fellows that I’m sure are quite nice - actually, I have it on good authority they’re quite nice, because…

If you don’t already know (because you probably don’t care), Community received a 4th season last week. However, it was only 13 episodes which caused a lot of people to panic I’m assuming because it sounds like it’s a warning bell that the show will be ending. No one seemed to be happy that there were going to be 13 more episodes (myself included). By the way, Parks and Rec and 30 Rock also received the same amount. So in this skewed perception of Community, technically, NBC doesn’t see the show any better or worse than those two shows as well. 

This year has been a gigantic mess for NBC, which Andy Greenwald outlines here. All of the schedule changes, semi-cancellations, Whitney, have sent the situation too far to return and is the source of Community fans’ frustration. However, this (Dan Harmon’s rant) is the worst move and for me, the most depressing. 

I’ve quickly run through the stages of grief over actually losing the show. The writing has been on the wall for awhile and I feel lucky to have the show even continue. The last episode on Thursday felt like the end of the show and with the creator excommunicated, it might as well be. Granted, the two people taking over are critically acclaimed (I think, I didn’t care to fact check that) and had their own high quality show (again, no fact checking) axed for low ratings. So it may work out to have them running the show. 

It probably shouldn’t be surprising that Harmon was treated that way. You could imagine that was how he was viewed by the network anyways. It’s still a shitty way to handle it, if it’s true. Next season will be odd. But at the very least, it’ll give us another reason to complain. Another thing that “the Man” took from us. Another reason, five years from now, to scream “YOU TOO?!?!” when you meet someone who also loved the show. It’s better that way. If the show ran for 10 years and was hugely popular, we all know we would eventually turn against it and pretend we never liked it, except for the second season when it was at it’s greatest and a couple of guest spots in the fifth season when the writers were inspired again. It’ll be that much more legendary to have Community implode and mishandled by the network than to have it ride off into the sunset.

So thank you, Dan Harmon, and the rest of the people behind one of my favorite shows. It’s been fantastic. Good luck with everything in the future.

—Tim

thedailywhat:

Lights Out: R.I.P. MCA.

[emi.]

I still think this the greatest video of the ’90s.

At Universal Studios, they have a roller coaster that allows you to pick a song to play in speakers behind your head during the ride. James and I both picked “Sabatoge,” because there is no other song in the history of recorded music that is better suited for a crazy roller coaster than “Sabatoge.”

I own no Beastie Boys albums and only really know their singles. But over the years, I’ve grown to respect them as musicians I know that I should respect simply because other people hold them in such high esteem.

We at The Compass must recognize the loss the creative world has suffered. But, much more importantly, humanity has lost someone devoted to making a better world.

Thank you.

-Paul

Cool Accidents: Are We Losing Respect For Music?

coolaccidents:

Via The Telegraph

This isn’t a critique of Simon Cowell, the Baron Bowdleriser of Pop, the exploitation culture of talent shows, or the paucity of music in the London 2012 Festival programme. It’s much simpler than that. I’m worried about our listening habits.

Look at the panorama of…

If you listen to music at all (which is probably all people reading The Compass), give this short article a read. The easy access to music that we now have has allowed us to avoid music that isn’t easy to get into. Is that what’s best for our creative interests?

-Paul

coolaccidents:

Above is a sneak(er) peek into a project we’re working on called In Their Shoes.

We’ve joined forces with Converse & Sharpie and over the course of this year we’ll be approaching a whole bunch of international and local music artists, arming them with a pair of plain white Converse and a stack of Sharpie fabric markers and giving them full artistic licence to do what they want with them, creating unique one of a kind works of art.

Later in the year we’ll be auctioning off the shoes online with all proceeds raised going to various different charities that each artist/band will choose.

So be sure to keep your dial locked to www.coolaccidents.com for more info and to have a chance at owning some pretty sweet music memorabilia once it goes to auction.

Saw this a neat little project awhile ago and figured I would share it. This should give Paul plenty of joy and may rob him of any savings if any of the shoes are from his favorite bands. 

This also makes me want to buy blank Converses to decorate myself. 

—Tim

Saturday Reblog: (Resist: Seriously please don't support Invisible Children INC. Anymore....)

resistapathy:

Not only are their spending habits as a non profit horrible (Mainly cause the organization has so far only been successful as sending rich white kids to Africa)

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=12429

But If you watch their first documentary, its basically a…

Recently, I wrote about the power of the Internet and its influence on our actions and motivations as human beings. I focused on its relation to music, and praised its ability to promote independent and new artists, while lamenting its dulling effect on our sense of morality. The duality of the Internet is what makes it so powerful; it can unite people to accomplish great things (like Kickstarter projects, TED talks or Kiva.org) or can trick us into accepting behavior we wouldn’t tolerate in other places.

Tuesday night, Facebook exploded. It seemed that everyone was sharing a video called Kony 2012, imploring their friends to take a few minutes to watch something incredibly important. I didn’t heed their advice - it was a few minutes before my bedtime - but I knew that it would produce another burst of energy that would quickly dissipate, like so many Internet events before it.

In case you haven’t seen the fervent promotions of this video, here’s the basics: Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, has employed the use of several thousand child soldiers over the years. Most of this occurred in Uganda, but he has since left that country. He is being targeted by an organization called Invisible Children; their goal is to see the United States use military force to arrest Kony and try him for his crimes.

Usually, I use the Saturday Reblog just to share a longer essay or story by somebody else. It’s a way to promote the creativity of others, one of our two goals here at The Compass. Today, I want to add some deeper and more thoughtful commentary. I hope that this adds another dimension to an issue that has been covered throughout the Internet.

Clearly, Kony has done evil things and ought to be tried for his crimes. The video created by Invisible Children compels you to do something to stop this evil. How can you, someone of immense relative privilege living in America, stand by while these innocent African children are brutalized? It’s an understandable reaction to want to do something, and one that’s important to respect by acting appropriately in your response. Here’s where you have two choices.

If this video affected you, which it likely did, than you can adopt this cause and work to change the situation. You would then do research to learn more about the situation (even a half-hour YouTube video can’t contain all of the pertinent information about a topic), and realize that it’s an incredibly complex situation. The Ugandan government is corrupt and has also committed atrocities. You live far away and can’t do anything directly. The US government is overwhelmed by its responsibilities to its people and the world. It’s easy at this moment to give up and head to option #2 or do nothing at all. I’d encourage you not to do this, but to persevere. Social change does not happen with an epiphany. “The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice,” the great Dr. King was said. Upon realizing that this is something that matters to you, something you want to change even if it’s really hard, you’d take a first step down that road. (I don’t know what that would be for this particular case, so you’ll have to figure that out yourself.)

Or, you can go with option #2. This is the option that people take when they are moved by something unpleasant but don’t do anything to actually change the situation. In this digital age, this response often manifests itself on Facebook. Women post the color of their bras that they’re currently wearing to promote breast cancer awareness; political partisans share images that distill complex issues into simple, brightly colored shades of a general idea; well-intentioned young people post videos about a subject they previously knew nothing about and implore others to listen. The problem with these examples and others is that simply promoting awareness of difficult issues will not change things. In order for something to change, you must take action. Posting a video is not action.

Please do not misunderstand me. I want everyone to be socially aware, to constantly refuse to accept the unacceptable. As members of a society that affords us the ability to do things other than hunt, forage and take shelter, we are obligated to be concerned about the welfare of our fellow man. But it is not easy. The important things rarely are. Getting attacked by police dogs in Birmingham wasn’t easy. Storming the beaches of Normandy wasn’t easy. A brother fighting his brother wasn’t easy. These things are done, like Kennedy said, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. They must be done. For myriad unfortunate and joyless reasons, they must be done.

If you fashion yourself a civic-minded person, someone who can not accept our failings as people, then you must rise above the temptation to click “like” or “share.” Gandhi didn’t say, “You must promote the change you wish to see in the world.” He said you must BE it. It has to reverberate through every muscle in your body, swim with every blood cell, be released into the world through every action and word. It will never be easy. But it will be the most important thing you do, and the world will be better for it.

-Paul

Below was a piece that The Daily What posted earlier this week in response to recent news about Rhianna and Chris Brown. Seemed like a good article to end the week. As we started with a controversial topic, so shall we end with a controversial topic. What are your thoughts?

thedailywhat:

On Abuse of the Day: Many different thoughts were shared in the notes of the post about Rihanna’s attempt to reconnect with Chris Brown despite their troubled — and troubling — history.
Victims of abuse came forward to share their stories and talk about what it means to get past the pain and the trauma of an experience that often requires a complete rebuilding of one’s life.
People with entrenched opinions on the matter expressed emotions that ran the gamut of every shade on the grayscale.
Responding to each remark individually would be an impossible task, and an unnecessary one. However, there was one recurring theme that does deserve addressing: The idea that the post was in any way an attempt to blame Rihanna for what happened.
Anyone who has read The Daily What for any length of time knows precisely where the site stands on issues of sexism, bullying, and victim blaming. It has taken vehement, unequivocal stands in the past against slut shaming, fat shaming, misogyny, and other social ills that do harm to women.
That a post published on the site is being perceived as insinuating that the victim of abuse is in any way at fault for that abuse is extremely upsetting. However, there is no doubt many did perceive it as such, and for that an apology is most certainly due.
In denouncing disagreeable language, however, it is important not to lose sight of what is being said: Something indescribably horrible took place that night, and the person who did that horrible thing has shown not one shred of unrehearsed remorse.
And why should he? He is being welcomed back into fame and fortune by his fans, and his famous friends, and yes — even the victim of that horrible thing.
However Rihanna chooses to deal with her abuse is her choice and hers alone. But looking back at the comments made by many in objection to the post, it’s hard to overlook another recurring theme: Rihanna is over it, so we should all get over it as well.
That, at the end, is the message: Chris Brown beats a woman to within an inch of her life, does nothing to apologize for it, tells critics of his Grammy appearance to “f*ck off,” and gets a free pass for all of it because the woman he beat up forgives him.
But does that mean the rest of us must? Does that mean nothing can ever be said or written about the terrible lesson being taught to impressionable young fans — that all abusers should ultimately be forgiven, even if they show no contrition whatsoever?
I will absolutely apologize to anyone who felt the tone of the post was disrespectful to the victim, or in any way reminiscent of victim-blaming, but I will not apologize for hating Chris Brown, for hating domestic abuse, and for hating forgiveness that has not been earned.
(P.S. As I was writing this, the Chris Brown remix of Rihanna’s “Birthday Cake” leaked. In it, Brown croons “Girl I wanna f*ck you right now. Been a long time, I’ve been missing your body.”
You tell me: Is it all right to hate this?)

Below was a piece that The Daily What posted earlier this week in response to recent news about Rhianna and Chris Brown. Seemed like a good article to end the week. As we started with a controversial topic, so shall we end with a controversial topic. What are your thoughts?

thedailywhat:

On Abuse of the Day: Many different thoughts were shared in the notes of the post about Rihanna’s attempt to reconnect with Chris Brown despite their troubled — and troubling — history.

Victims of abuse came forward to share their stories and talk about what it means to get past the pain and the trauma of an experience that often requires a complete rebuilding of one’s life.

People with entrenched opinions on the matter expressed emotions that ran the gamut of every shade on the grayscale.

Responding to each remark individually would be an impossible task, and an unnecessary one. However, there was one recurring theme that does deserve addressing: The idea that the post was in any way an attempt to blame Rihanna for what happened.

Anyone who has read The Daily What for any length of time knows precisely where the site stands on issues of sexism, bullying, and victim blaming. It has taken vehement, unequivocal stands in the past against slut shaming, fat shaming, misogyny, and other social ills that do harm to women.

That a post published on the site is being perceived as insinuating that the victim of abuse is in any way at fault for that abuse is extremely upsetting. However, there is no doubt many did perceive it as such, and for that an apology is most certainly due.

In denouncing disagreeable language, however, it is important not to lose sight of what is being said: Something indescribably horrible took place that night, and the person who did that horrible thing has shown not one shred of unrehearsed remorse.

And why should he? He is being welcomed back into fame and fortune by his fans, and his famous friends, and yes — even the victim of that horrible thing.

However Rihanna chooses to deal with her abuse is her choice and hers alone. But looking back at the comments made by many in objection to the post, it’s hard to overlook another recurring theme: Rihanna is over it, so we should all get over it as well.

That, at the end, is the message: Chris Brown beats a woman to within an inch of her life, does nothing to apologize for it, tells critics of his Grammy appearance to “f*ck off,” and gets a free pass for all of it because the woman he beat up forgives him.

But does that mean the rest of us must? Does that mean nothing can ever be said or written about the terrible lesson being taught to impressionable young fans — that all abusers should ultimately be forgiven, even if they show no contrition whatsoever?

I will absolutely apologize to anyone who felt the tone of the post was disrespectful to the victim, or in any way reminiscent of victim-blaming, but I will not apologize for hating Chris Brown, for hating domestic abuse, and for hating forgiveness that has not been earned.

(P.S. As I was writing this, the Chris Brown remix of Rihanna’s “Birthday Cake” leaked. In it, Brown croons “Girl I wanna f*ck you right now. Been a long time, I’ve been missing your body.”

You tell me: Is it all right to hate this?)

Cool Accidents: Percy Sledge x Frank Ocean

coolaccidents:



Today we’re featuring the legendary Percy Sledge and the up and coming Frank Ocean as part of our new Sampled series.

Frank Ocean part of the over hyped Odd Future collective shines rolling solo and ties himself nicely to soul’s southern roots by sampling Percy’s monster smash hit ‘When…

Found this earlier this week by accident. It’s a pretty nice little Tumblr and this song is killer. I really can’t wait for Frank Ocean to release his own album. If he does, it should be spectacular. Make sure to click thru to Cool Accidents to hear the song

They have a bunch of other mashups on there which I haven’t had a chance to check out yet but now that they’ll pop up in my timeline, eventually I’ll get to that. 

I’ve actually gone on a following spree on here and Twitter. Just trying to bring some new stuff into view but I’d love to hear any suggestions from people. Anything unique with music, art, or sports I’ll check out. Definitely looking for possibly under the radar stuff where they bring their own analysis to it. It’s always good to see different opinions from people. There’s a lot out there. 

—Tim